Decentralised Teaching and Learning

“Not all who wander are lost”. J R R Tolkien

Food, glorious food!

In this post I give you a lesson to use with your learners on the topic of ‘Food’.

Everyone has their own memories of school dinners. One of mine is not being allowed to leave the dinner table until I had finished my dessert – gelatinous bright-pink blancmange!

So in this lesson I focus on the problem of Global Food Waste.

Uber-busy teachers can get the full lesson plan here (also see below).

 


 
Procedure

1. Ask the learners to talk about the following questions in pairs:

What did you eat today?

What have you eaten this week?

How much food have you thrown away in the past week?

How do you feel about wasting food?

What do people in (your country) say about wasting food?

2. Ask learners to feedback some of their responses.

3. Ask the learners the following questions in open class and elicit responses:

 What kind of societies waste a lot of food?

 Why is this?

 Is it a bad thing?

4. Explain that you’re going to show a video in which an activist against Food Waste gives a speech (activist = someone who works to achieve political or social change).

5. Tell the learners that there might be some new vocabulary in the film. Give out the vocabulary worksheet and ask them to fill in any vocabulary they already know, or just to take a guess if they feel confident.

6. Watch the film (with English subs) It’s 14:12 minutes long.

7. After the film, ask the learners to think, and write down their immediate reaction to Tristram’s speech in one sentence. Compare their sentences in pairs.

8. Go over the vocabulary answers (page 5 of lesson plan).

9. Print out the Food Waste Facts from Tristan Stuart’s website. Get the learners to pick one (or more) of the Food Waste Facts and in pairs/ groups come up with three possible solutions to this problem. Tell them to try and use some of the vocabulary from the film.

10. Pairs of groups present their ‘Food Waste Fact’ and proposed solutions to the rest of the group.

Conclusion

I hope that you found this lesson useful. If so, I would be really grateful if you could take one minute to answer this survey.

Also, if you have any comments, feel free to get in touch!

 

paul

 

Images

Featured image courtesy of chotda on Flickr, CC license.

 

 

 

 

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One comment on “Food, glorious food!

  1. paulwalsh
    August 20, 2014

    And here’s the lyrics to ‘Food glorious food!’. We actually used to sing this at school a long time ago…

    Like

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